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What have you used to Insulate your truck?

I am looking for some kind of insulation for my 387.

What have you used?

What should I stay away from?

Answer this question I have this problem too

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3 Answers

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Blackwood, I think he's referring to how to get rid of engine noise, heat and those pesky winter drafts. I re-worded the question and corrected the spelling for him.

Jason, to re-insulate the truck, you will need at least R-7 value insulation. Truck dealers will sell you the cheapest stuff possible, and always at a ridiculous mark-up. The best thing to get from the dealer will be a piece of paper called a floor template... It's designed to help you mark out the necessary holes where pedals, the seats and the steering column pass through.

Shaw Flooring makes an under-floor pad that is designed to help you re-insulate uneven floor surfaces such as concrete, metal and OSB, and it allows you to install a brand-new floor on top of it. This product is available at your local Home Depot or Menards for around $40 for 100 square feet. I am looking at getting some for my '94 Volvo this coming weekend.

You will then need to select a replacement floor. Iowa 80 Chrome Shop and Joplin 44 Chrome Shop carry flooring materials for many different Peterbilt models... including the 387. Call them at 1-866-4-IOWA-80 or visit http://www.iowa80.com.

For the doors, a good high-quality weather strip material is a must. Check with the dealer for the appropriate size of weatherstripping material and then try to get it from your local auto parts store (NAPA, AutoZone, Advance Auto Parts, etc...) or Iowa 80. Ditto for the Doghouse (in-cab access panel to the engine, if your truck has one... some conventional class 8 trucks do, as do almost all cabovers).

For the walls, some companies will offer "spray-in" or "Blown-in" insulation. This process involves removing the door, wall, headliner and sleeper panels, spraying in a special chemical made from recycled paper and then replacing the panels. It's costly, but it's very effective at controlling the temperature and reducing noise in the cab. Get a quote to see how much it'll cost you and how much fuel it's going to save you (especially in the winter, when a properly insulated cab makes the difference between too cold and just right with the engine off).

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Thanks Zach, my iPhone stuck again.

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I have an Idlefree APU, but my condo is so big even with the curtain drawn I can get the temp down enough for me to be comfortable sometimes.

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I hear you. The Volvo mid-roof WIA that I drive has similar issues with the stock HVAC system, as I found out yesterday. It just can't get all that hot and humid air out, because the cab is so drafty that no climate control system can work effectively to cool or heat the space. That's why I'm looking at replacing the 20-year-old, incredibly musty subfloor with a new one.

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If your referring to like anti-thief type devices I have a valve piped into my brake system where I can valve off my parking brakes so they can't be released. I also have a master lock out on my cranking system. Each with time could be located and defeated but the fact that it would take time to locate each and undo them would be frustrating to say the least.

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Thanks it makes sense now.....

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One would think that with all the emission standards the Government has put on engines and APUs, that the manufacturers would be required to insulate vehicles to make the more efficient when it comes to heating and cooling.

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I'm sure that's coming with the future GHG (green house gas reduction) requirements. However, for now, most truck makers only put a 3/16" sheet of insulation in the cab... which is not nearly enough to properly insulate the cab.

They need 2" on the walls and 1/2" to 3/4" on the floor, along with a moisture barrier and proper drainage to prevent the floor's insulation from getting wet. What they put on now is not nearly as much as what they need. A advanced material will be necessary if they want to use anything thinner than 1/2".

However, until the GHG and manufacturing standards catch up to driver demands, we may have to re-insulate the cab ourselves when we buy a truck if the HVAC system does not keep up with the demands of the driver.

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Jason Burns will be eternally grateful.
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