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ISX camshaft will lucas oil help prevent it from going bad?

I have an 07 ISX i just want to know if lucas oil or any other additive will help the camshaft from going bad. What else can i do? from a perventative perspective

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Answer this question I have this problem too

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I had a 09 cascadia with a isx .had the camc changed at 350 k the freightliner shop forgot to change the oil after changing the cams . I noticed the next day they rushed me in . Then it started using a lot of oil then locked up a week later . Should they have to fix the truck

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got a 2000 ISX been adding 2 gallons each oil change 950000 miles and no proplems yet

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Are you running synthetic or conventional, I'm looking to switch my 2000 pre egg ISx to full synthetic, anything I should look or

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04 ISX 1013062 miles, been using 1 gal lucas with each oil change. no problems yet, I don't know which years were supposed to be worse

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Exactly,

Watch your oil analysis and if you see higher levels of Iron, pull the valve cover immediately and visually inspect all the cam lobes. If you see the outer coating flaking off the cam, you know it will fail very shortly. Well worth the effort to keep it from breaking on the side of the road.

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I sampled every 20 000 miles on my ISX and saw ZERO increase in iron. It went from a perfect sample to a top end knock at idle a week after I got my sample results back. one lobe was almost gone off of the exhaust shaft. From what I see though, I think these cam issues seem to be primarily on the DPF units.

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From what Kevin was reading about these cam shafts the answer would be no. Since Lucas is an oil thickener I would actually think it would be a very bad idea to add Lucas period. He stated that the clearances weren't that good and didn't allow the oil to get where it needed to be so if it's thicker it would accentuate the problem.

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have an '02 isx.. just replaced both cams at 1,253,112 miles.. i have always run lucas. and when i had my overhead run about 5 months ago the cams looked good.. even the smallest pitting in in the outercoating on cam lobes will cause it to wear out really quickly.. so i dont know if lucas really helps for more than at start up and as an oil thickener

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Well there goes my theory on it only seems the dpf trucks are affected lol. I stand corrected.

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Doesn't it beg the question, why is there a need for any type of additive to compensate for a lousy rocker arm design, that seems more apparent in the 2005 and newer ISX engines? What, if any, does the CJ-4 oils not provide the protection for a design that was developed prior to CJ-4 standard? Cummins is sure being tight lipped about all of this, even though they have acknowledged there is a problem.

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The problem you all are having is what is known as fatigue failure. That is where the paper clip breaks after 10 bends instead of 100. All metal parts flex under load and this is true of cam lobes as well. It is true that when early chipping/flaking of the lobes starts it's an indication that the mudslide is about to begin. When parts are hardened for wear, there is a final step that imparts the "toughness" needed to handle the flexing. If this is done improperly or omitted, fatigue failure is almost guaranteed. Unfortunately, there is nothing lubricant-wise that will help. MicroBlue will not stop this problem either. The only way to stop the flexing is to park it or replace the cam. I hate to be the bearer of bad news.

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Lucus only boost the weight of the oil so if you have 15/40w and add Lucus it boosts it to 15/50w. You might look at Motorkote, it's a friction fighter. I have used it for several years in everything I have. I can only tell you that I have a Yukon that I melted the planetary gears twice in three years. I was told that this is a common failure in Yukon /Tahoe and trucks that run 4L60E transmissions. After paying for this repair twice I added the amount advised to the transmission fluid and have run and towed with this vehicle for the last 6 years without any trouble from the transmission. Call Motorkote or go to their website and read the testimonials.....

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One might consider looking for an oil that has a high level of moly in it. Molybdenum Disulfide is the premier friction modifier that one can get in an oil. And by it being already a part of the mix, there is nothing to add and dilute the oil formulation. Here are 3 articles on why Moly is a great component in an oil.... www.bobistheoilguy.com/moly-basics/ Now, one can continue to play with snake oil marketing, or go with something the entire lubrication industry recognizes as a proven, reliable friction modifier. And since it is part of the oil chemistry from the motor oil maker who uses it in their mix, there is nothing extra to pay for or add. Doesn't get a whole lot better than that. I have no doubt that some who have used one of the marketed friction reducers has gotten good results, but that is hardly scientific and only anecdotal at best. I am not going to risk a $30,000 motor on the testimony of someone who threw it in their personal vehicle. I need to see dozens of engine teardown and component inspections. With molybdenum disulfide, that already has been done years ago by the oil industry and component manufacturers themselves. Not Joe's truck repair shop in Rocks Throw, Wherever.

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Cliff I can tell you that I have used this product in my engine transmission and rears over the last million miles of service in my truck, along with knowing several others that have done the same. I would say that is hardly anecdotal, I can't speak for everybody but I have had good results and continue to use the product.

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But how would you know that what you added was actually doing what you seem to feel it is if you do not have a control group study showing that similar components under similar conditions fail sooner without the product? I have taken engines to 1.4 million miles on just conventional oil alone, and no major repair, no bypass, no snake oil. And sold to the next owner who put it right to work with no major repair. But even that is anecdotal, not definitive case study. Lucas likes their little crank machine at the auto parts counter that has no relevance to a working engine that has heat and shearing forces attacking the oil and additive. And Motorkote likes to use the dubious Timken Bearing Machine tester, or "one armed bandit" as it is known in the lube industry, which can be manipulated by the demonstrator to even show Head and Shoulder's shampoo beating the best synthetic engine oil! Basing one's buying and use decisions on stuff like that is pretty bad methodology.

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,,, I suspect that the case (surface) hardness is not thick enough and that is why oil analysis don't show it. And once it starts flaking it goes quickly. Early 3406 E's had this prob, but the Manu got it solved relatively quickly.

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Nick Spitzer will be eternally grateful.
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