Skip to main content

Site Navigation

Your Account

Choose Language

If you like a particular feature. Vote it up. The more votes the better change you have of getting it done soon. Happy Voting.

24 Questions View all

deadhead percentage miles ratio formula percentage

what is the math formula to figure your percentage of deadhead miles

Answer this question I have this problem too

Is this a good question?

Score 0
Add a comment

6 Answers

Most Helpful Answer

I really don't use a DH percentage. A better figure is revenue per hub mile.

Write down your mileage at the first of the week, then the end of the week. Subtract the first of the week mileage from the last of the week, which will give you total miles run for the week. Say I started the week at 100,000 miles, then at the end of the week, total miles were 102,000. 102,000-100,000 = 2,000 miles. If my total revenue for the week was $4,400, I would divide that by the 2000 miles run, to come up with $2.20 cents of revenue per hub mile. Which is how my tires, shocks, suspension, etc. wear out, by every mile run.

But, if you must really know DH percentage; say of those total 2,000 miles, 200 were DH, you would divide 200 DH miles by the total miles of 2000, giving you .10, or 10% DH miles.

Was this answer helpful?

Score 3
Add a comment

Jeff, you're just dividing the DH miles by the total of all miles. This will give you a decimal number; 8% would be .08, one just moves the decimal two places to the right, and that is your percent figure you are looking for.

But if you are trying to cut your DH by setting a goal for low DH, then in my opinion you are misguided.

I live in Texas, and recently took a trip to south CO, I got about $3 a mile for the trip. But getting out of CO with a dry van, they wanted to load me up with 45,000 and pay me about $1 a mile. I DH about 400 miles to PU a load that was paying the same, $600 for 185 miles. I made the same, but hauled for a shipper that wasn't trying to rip off trucks. In addition, on those 400 DH miles, I got at least .75 mpg better than had I hauled their cheap freight.

So, here's some more math. At $4 a gallon, pulling 45,000, at 8 mpg for 600 miles, It would have cost 600/(divided by)8=75 gallons burned at $4 X 75 = $300 fuel cost.

Running MT for 415 miles/ 8.75 mpg = 47.43 gallons burned times $4 a gallon = $189.72 plus 185 loaded miles/ 8 mpg = 23.13 times $4 a gallon = $92.52 + $189.72 = 282.42 - the $300 of fuel for no DH, for a fuel savings of $17.58. Not much money, but still, by DH of 415 miles for good freight, I made more money than trying to cut my DH by hauling cheap freight.

Also, if a broker calls you, you're in a better position to bargain, than if you call them. I've had them come up 30% on the rate they first quote on the first call. I've had them call back later and offer double their first offer. They don't make money unless you take the load.

But brokers have called me with loads of 170 miles DH or more, and paid me my $2 a mile rate or better. Tell them what you want, stand firm, look at the total money and divide it by the total miles. Don't trust a brokers miles, look them up for yourself. Then multiply them by the rate per mile you need to be profitable. Many times it makes more sense to DH, than to haul Cheap & Heavy!

Was this answer helpful?

Score 3
Add a comment

all miles is 'a' , deadhead miles is 'b' and 'x' is deadhead percentage

a 120000 (example all miles)

b 15000 (deadhead example)

x = b * 100 / a

x= 15000 * 100/120000

x= 1500000/120000

x= 12.5 percent deadhead

Was this answer helpful?

Score 1
Add a comment

I stiil don't get it

Was this answer helpful?

Score 0

Comments:

what don't you get?

by

Add a comment

I did the math and I came up with 8 percent and I agree if all miles average to a profit but how can I set a goal if I don't have a target I want to keep my deadhead under 10 percent and my average in my bottomline and above

Was this answer helpful?

Score 0
Add a comment

I don't. Understand the forumla I know your right I took my calautor took 120000 divide 15000. Eqeals 8 then I press precentage and it is 12.5can you do the math long hand thanks

Was this answer helpful?

Score 0

Comments:

deadhead miles is 15,000

all miles is 120,000

15,000 / 120,000 = .125

That equals 12.5%

That's the longhand of the math

I would read sjh's post however, he had great example of why lower deadhead is not always better.

by

Add a comment

Add your answer

martin will be eternally grateful.
View Statistics:

Past 24 Hours: 0

Past 7 Days: 6

Past 30 Days: 25

All Time: 3,416