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Bicycle tax deductible

There are times that I want to go some where and I can not unhook and take just the truck and other times that I am close to the house but can not justify driving to the house because of the price of fuel just to sleep at home. With a Motorcycle would make it easy to justify 100 miles from time to time on a good back road to the house.

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Since you would use the bike for personal transportation it would not be a tax deductible expense.

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If you had a motorcycle, and its your own business I'm pretty sure you can claim the mileage you put on the bike. A vehicle is a vehicle. If you used it to drive to and from your truck than you can count it.

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you can only write off business use of a vehicle. i'm not sure he would be able to classify that as commuting.

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He would be using it for his business. Example, you park your truck right off an exit of a hwy and drive your personal car home (if you left your car there). You NEED that car to run your business (getting to your truck), therefore you can claim the $.55 a mi for use of that vehicle. If you bought a motorcycle, the mileage would be recorded on the title, if you where to get audited, you will have current mileage on the bike from when you bought it and as long as the mileage you claimed matched what was on the bike and the distance to drive to the truck in back you would be fine. No dout in my mind that would win in court, your not cheating anything.

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I would say yes, but taxes are subjective. I believe I could defend this in court, because taking the truck to the store to get supplies at $1.27 cpm, vs the small cost of taking a bike, cuts cost thus producing more taxable profit. The law says any expense that is used in the production of income is deductible. (this would work for an OO only, unless you pay per mile to use their truck)

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That's a bit of a stretch. You'd have to be able to prove it was necessary to the operation of your business and not for personal use. Unless you are Lance Armstrong and your bike is worth $20K, I might want to steer away from that IRS controversy.

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No, a bicycle and a motorcycle ARE NOT tax deductible, unless you're a professional bicyclist (Lance Armstrong with his $20,000 TREK, or anyone on Team Specialized) or motorcyclist (the gal on the T-mobile commercial who gets paid to ride a special Ducati for them, someone who works at Orange County Choppers test riding motorcycles for them, etc...). You would have to PROVE it was used for business (most of the time, a motorcycle is not because it can't necessarily be ridden in inclement weather and it's most often used for personal entertainment, NOT business).

And a hundred miles just to get from your parking spot to the house is just wrong. I would consider finding closer parking instead, even if there is a fee to do it. Parking fees are tax deductible, a bike likely is not.

Another option: a cheap, fuel efficient car. There are cars on the market that get 40+ MPG and still cost less than some new motorcycles. One such car is the new Ford Fiesta. Another is the KIA Forte. Yet another is the new Dodge Dart. And then there's plenty of USED cars that could be used for the same purpose (Ford Escort, some Hyundais, Chevrolet Cobalt, etc...). And, you can justify your mileage in the car as a business expense.

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I deduct all the mileage I put on my pick-up for getting parts or even the commuting miles from home to my truck parking area. However, the actual purchase of the pick-up is not deductible, as far as I know.

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You cannot deduct commutingto and from work, once you get to work, if your work requires you to go somewhere else then your milage starts at that point until you get back to your workplace then stops. The biclycle is not a direct necessary item needed to perform your work so its iffy. I put it in the catagory of you can deduct anything until the time comes that you get audited

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