Skip to main content

Site Navigation

Your Account

Choose Language

good pre-purchase procedure when purchasing a used truck

We all know it's a considerable risk purchasing any used truck, one that should not be done with the least bit of carelessness... I mean, we all hear of bad stories that I feel, in hindsight, are preventable, that could be caught with a competent inspection.

So besides the inexpensive DOT inspection, which would still expose some of the potential issues...

What other kind of detailed inspection could one hire a good shop to perform that would expose a more accurate level of dependability of your new proposed rig?

Furthermore, how much would one spend for this type of service?

I can't imagine the amount of stress that would fall heavily on the damned sole that is caught in a bad spot. Can we lessen the risk with getting into an older truck?

I'm looking at getting my first rig of pre 02, either 14L or 12.7 s60, 13spd

Answer this question I have this problem too

Is this a good question?

Score 0
Add a comment

4 Answers

Most Helpful Answer

I would take oil samples from the engine, trans and both rears. Most truck shops have a more detailed inspection than your typical annual inspection I believe it's a C inspection. Most dealerships have these inspection forms and can preform them.....

Was this answer helpful?

Score 1

Comments:

do oil samples take age consideration of how long that oil has been in use? obviously the more miles on one oil change would show more anyone particles in an oil sample.

I've read about that and that would seem like a good practice, but what if they changed the oil? I guess it wouldn't be as likely with the trans & rear, but possible. if so, I guess it would be a fruitless inquiry. Tho, how about a dyno? If that's done and there is a problem, would that show up on the magnetic plugs after a dyno? what if there were no problems? would it still show a little material after a dyno?

by

Add a comment

Chances are they would have changed the fluids. About the best you could do is have it put on dyno and check the magnetic chip plugs for metal afterward. Check the overdrive section of the transmission make sure it doesn't drift out of overdrive. Check the drive line and carrier bearing for any slack. Check the clutch and clutch brake. Look at the steering and drive tires for uneven wear. Jack up the truck and check for king pin wear. Check the steering box for excessive play, Check the mounting bolts on the 5th wheel mounting plate (mounting plate to frame) slider jaws and air cylinder for damage and leaks. Check the frame members for cracks, missing, loose or broken rivets & bolts. Battery cables and ground straps. Air compressor for recovery time and air governor for proper operation. Excessive slack in the 5th wheel jaws. Springs / air bags, shackles and U bolts. Wheel Bearings, brakes, brake cams & slack adjusters. You most likely end up with two bills one from the shop and another one for the dyno. I'd get the dyno done at a factory engine branch. If your serious about the truck the money you spend is cheap insurance. You wouldn't by a boat without getting it surveyed or an airplane without doing a pre purchase inspection. Why would you buy a class 8 truck without one.

Was this answer helpful?

Score 1

Comments:

great stuff. [br]

- Tho I hadn't thought about getting it dyno'd then checking the magPlugs. Would that likely expose any indications of potential problems? Would a shop take that into an "oil sample" scenario and see what's there from the plug? that makes sense [br]

- I could see myself spending a good 45 minutes in a parking lot going over the majority of items you'd spoken of. I'll bring my coveralls & gloves. This would certainly help expose any potential problems before paying to have a pre purchase inspection done... I don't want anyone to hear preventable nightmares from my end. [br]

- "Jack up the truck and check for king pin wear." You mean, "jack up the trailer & check the king pin for excessive wear" right? For now, I'm talking only tractor purchase. please explain if I'm misunderstanding this, your comment. [br]

- "Excessive slack in the 5th wheel jaws." How would one check that? I've never reached inside of a good or bad 5th wheel plate to see if the jaws move a little by hand.

by

To check the jaws on the 5th wheel you need to hook up to a trailer and pull forward and backwards and feel for any slack in the jaws. Some can be adjusted other have to be rebuilt. Jacking the front end up under one side of the steering axle far enough to get a digging bar or long pipe under. Pull on the pipe like a crow bar and look at the wheel as you do it. If their seems to be excessive play or movement their may be an issue. A common trick to get one past inspection is to pack them with extra heavy grease. By jacking it up and using the pipe you have much more leverage than doing it by hand. A free a good Dyno run pulling the chip plugs out of the rear rear end, power divider and transmission look for excesive metal flakes on the plugs.

by

That was supposed to be after the Dyno not free Dyno

by

I thought what you meant by kingpin was the kingpin on the trailer. Are you referring to the steering linkage up on front axle? Kingpin? I'm not too familiar with every piece thereof. I'll have to have a look. Post up a cellphone video up on YouTube. I'll do the same if I beat you to it.

by

King pins as in the pins that support the and hold the steering knuckles in place on the steering axle. Not to be confused by the king pin that locks in to the 5th wheel on your trailer

by

Add a comment

If you look at the oil you should be able to tell if the oil has been changed recently. The dyno idea is a good tool too. The shop sill hook up a monomer (gauge that measures crankcase pressure while engine is pulling) if the pressure is too high it tells you the engine is worn out.

Was this answer helpful?

Score 0

Comments:

Im sure there's a ton of info like this. Great stuff, thanks for your input

by

Add a comment

All these answers are spot on, but one hint. If the interior has extreme wear, like door panels are torn, panels are damaged, busted dash trim, filth on the floor or carpet, driver probably wasn't much on pm's. Most trucks I looked at before I bought mine, and ones I saw for friends, spoke volumes on the trucks life before you. Yeah, there will be wear like the steering wheel, petals, door arm rests, but if it looks like they didn't care for the interior, they probably didn't care much about the service intervals

Was this answer helpful?

Score 0
Add a comment

Add your answer

Your will be eternally grateful.
View Statistics:

Past 24 Hours: 0

Past 7 Days: 3

Past 30 Days: 11

All Time: 666