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which would be the best truck to go with

i have 3 trucks from 2 dealerships i'm looking @ & ask for opinions on which would be the best to go with & they are as follows:

1 dealership has this truck:

2006 international 9400, 435hp cummins isx, ultra-shift od, 2:64 rears, 22.5lp all steel wheels, mid 700's on miles; $22,500 - $26,500 (several to choose from)

another dealership has the following trucks:

2007 freightliner columbia, 14liter detroit @ 470hp, ultra-shift od, 22.5lp all steel wheels, 3:58 rears $19,950 - $21,950, mid to high 600's on miles (several to choose from)

2007 international 9400, cummins 450hp isx, ultra-shift od, 22.5 all aluminum (w/super singles), very high 600's to high 800's $18,450 to $21,950.

can someone tell me which would be the best 1 go with out of these three. i plan to pull a flat & hopper bottom running all over the great usa & drive around 70 mph. any & all input is greatly appreciated.

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Those trucks are spec'd to run around 65mph. For 70mph look for 3.40 or 3.36 rears. If you ran 65mph i'd go with the high mileage iinternational - if you can get it for (or under) $15000 - and plan on rebuilding with a pitt power or pdi de-egr.

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the 2:64 rears or 3:55 or 58 wouldn't work?

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With 2.64 rears and wide single tires i'm turning around 1470 rpms at 65mph. 70 mph will put the engine around 1650 (iirc) which is to high for an isx to get fuel economy. 2.64 with a direct drive is about the same ratio as 3.55 and 3.58. I don't know how well a detroit does above 1500 rpm for fuel.

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the truck with the 2:64 rears has duals only on steel wheels. i figure if u go above 1500 rpm's u can kiss any fuel economy goodbye real quick

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You'll find out in a hurry running 70 mph is a money loosing proposition. I'd want something with more gears. You will want one for pulling heavy and staying in the low 60 mph. and another one for running a little faster empty.

Super singles are the way to go I guess but if you run where there is snow or ice they are widow makers my new driver told me.

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Who did your new driver hear that from? Lol

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I drove with wide-based singles in the snow plenty of times and had no issue, then again I know how to exercise proper throttle control on slick conditions too. You're new driver is not very experienced it sounds like.

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When he was in driving school they got to experiment with different setups. Much harder to bring it out of a possible JK on the skid pad and on ice you could feel the singles fish tailing more.

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just making a sarcastic joke...since he's still around :)

i've ran wide singles for the past 4 years in the northwest and never had problems yet there's drivers who tried and hate them - maybe just a question of getting used to them and learning how they grip on different surface types.

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Ultra-Shift trans are nice, but very expensive to repair. The ECM for it is about $6000. Freightliner and Eaton-Fuller both told me that you can expect the ECM to begin failing around 650K to 750K miles. The X Y Shifter installed runs about $1400 installed. I like the trans for heavy traffic, but the cost to maintain far out ways that. I won't own another one.

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It sounds like you are looking at prior fleet trucks. Because of that I would stay far away from the ultra-shift trucks. Most fleets have them for the guys who can't shift to save their butts. The only way I would buy an ultra-shift (any automatic) would be if it was from a private party that has been in the business for a long time because they usually just don't want to shift anymore.

I understand that the price is looking good but with that many miles on an auto, your gonna be looking at some expensive repairs fairly soon.

Lastly, you will gain a lot of fuel economy if you slow down to at least 60. It sucks sometimes but you will feel better in your pocket book. 1MPG can add $12,000 +/- at the end of the year.

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take frieght liner international is just long way to spell junk coumins just magnifies problem dettroit more dependable better fuel m.pg.

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freightliner, international, peterbilt, kenworth, western star, etc; it's all on how u take care of them; as far as cummins goes; i like cummins & detroit. i agree that detroit is more dependable & better on fuel economy & have a better warranty if u get the extended warranty but the isx cummins i have now in the truck i'm driving is pretty good on pulling & ok (6.5 mpg avg. ) on fuel.

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sounds like you have a great source for preowned trucks - please share . you ever end up getting a truck? tell us about it, we all wanna hear

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Man, Your, You are quite the talker. You might want to change your user name. In the mean time, I suggest you keep looking, because '06s and '07s have EGR, which kills fuel economy at any speed. That's part of the reason why the price is so low. I would suggest a truck built prior to 2002.

Freightliner Columbias and Century Classes are very aerodynamic, and older models are available.

On a model with a 10-speed, look for the Detroit engine and 3:36 rear ends.

If you must go with the '06-07 (perhaps you live in California or drive there) I would still go with the Columbia, simply because of it's superior aerodynamics and ease of maintenance. Columbias are fantastic trucks for bulk hauling, especially when paired with a Timpte or Wilson hopper bottom.

Be careful about looking at the International 9400- That model almost ran my former employer broke, and after they switched to the Columbia and a couple other truly aerodynamic models (first Peterbilt 387, and now Volvo VN 780 after extensive testing), they initially gained over 2-3 MPG fleet average (they went from 4 MPG to 6 and now they get 7-8 MPG with rookie drivers, no less) and they used the fuel savings to grow the company. They now use Columbia, Cascadia and the Volvo VN almost exclusively, because of the fuel efficiency and driver comfort.

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My only suggestion about the 9200/9400 Internationals is to get the 2002 or later models with the dimmer switch on the signal switch and relays. That must be what almost broke your former boss? Other than a few blower motors, mine have been rattle free money makers. 2002 9400i 12.7 Detroit. 2006 9400i with a C-13 Cat. The 1999 and the 2001 models i had experienced a lot of headlight problems, always the wiring.

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Im running g 67-70mph pulling rail containers from chicago to twin cites usually around 65-70,000 gross and doing 6.7-7.3 depending on the wind, I'm in 18th doing 1500 at 70mph, same duel milage at 57-63 mph

2000 379 pete EXHD

Cummins 550isx 3.55 rears 24.5 LP

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I wouldn't own an International. Detroit Diesel engines are hard to beat and the hardest to beat is the 1998 pre-emissions Series 60 12.7L that you can only get now in a glider kit truck. There's a few used gliders on the market with life left in them.

Don't fool yourself by looking for a cheap truck with high miles. You'll spend more money in repair bills than you would (on truck payments and higher insurance) if you just went out and bought a NEW Columbia Glider from Fitzgerald Gliders - look them up on line.

You can get a new truck with 3 year, 300,000 mile warranty on the reman engine, tranny and rear-ends for only about $113,000 with no FET. If you put $13,000 of your $20,000 budget down on this new truck, your monthly payment would be around $2,000. and at the end of your 5-year note, you'll still own a good truck with plenty of life left in it.

The motor I'm talking about is legendary for overall reliability, cost of ownership and fuel economy - plus a new truck has all the advantages of being new; it will be a long time before you start paying major repair bills.

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