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Percent fuel content higher than my other truck

Using the Caterpillar oil sample program my recently purchased 2002 12.7 DDEC IV had a relatively high soot of 58 and a fuel content of 2.63%. The overhead has been run and the mpg averages 7.5 - 7.75. My 2006 c-13 cat has a soot of 22 and a fuel content of 1.32%. I drive both trucks the same way and same routes. The Detroit engine has 670k original miles. Should I add snake oil to the fuel, will it come out of it, and what would be the best snake oil to use?

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I split the last sample and Blackstone lab showed a fuel dilution of <.5% using flash point to determine fuel dilution. Caterpillar shows a fuel dilution of 3.54% using gas chromatography. Cat says their sample will show fuel that is partially burnt such as in an engine with excessive blow-by like mine. Blackstone Labs soot showed .4%. So now what? I would like to run this motor for about 250k miles yet. Fuel mileage is fantastic and all other tests are great

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If fuel dilution is the only thing that is showing up and has you concerned, I would not worry at this point. Reason, is that if the dilution was a serious problem, then your oil viscosity would be way out of acceptable range (too low because of thinning out), your wear metals would be going thru the roof, etc. If oil is staying within viscosity, your nitration level is within acceptable bounds, and your wear metals are not high, then fuel dilution is being measured by the cat shop improperly. The Blackstone report is more likely the accurate one.

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Something doesn't quite add up. That kind of fuel mileage with that much soot and fuel dilution. Detroit sets that bar at 5% on soot and 1% fuel dilution, so you are well above those limits. Now when we compare that to what you samples were showing from your Cat engine, I would say the lab that is doing the samples is goofy. Any fuel dilution of the levels you state, on either engine is cause for a red flag. And same for soot levels. 58 and I am surprised the oil is even flowing. 22 the same way. But then, it could be they are stating parts per million as opposed to the typical percentage levels of soot that most labs use. Still, fuel dilution is critical. And you did not state the miles on the oil when you sampled it.

Next time you run a sample, take an extra one and send it to another lab for comparison. I will be willing to bet that the two samples will not be the same result, and the lab you are using now has issues with their analysis.

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i have been oil sampling with cat lab in denver, co for a couple of years and they have a number for soot that i have yet to learn how they arrive at. i have been told it is a number for ft-ir (fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) sampling. someone in the higher up of the lab said he did not know what the equivalent of their number is in percentages (for that matter i don't even know if 2% soot is by mass or volume), but that their process is the latest advancement in oil testing technology. my soot numbers run about 25-30 every 15,000 miles on both my series 60's (i have 2 ddec 4's) and have reached over 100 (i needed to change air filters) and they were only yellow flagged. by the way, what do you mean by "snake oil"? some sort of fuel additive? i personally would dyno test the truck, particularly for exhaust gas blowby, to precisely know the condition of internal engine. if good enough to expect to get at least 250,000-300,000 miles, then go ahead and change injectors. your then more sure to get that mileage. otherwise, i think i would cost it in with an earlier overhaul and save some $$$ on labor.

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The only problem here is that while that lab may claim to be using the latest technology, if the results are not shown in accordance with industry standards, it is difficult at best or even down right impossible to have a frame of reference to objectively determine the soot level, fuel dilution, etc. In essence then, the results are meaningless. For it to have any relevance, the results have to be in a parts per million format or a percentage. Seems this lab is not conforming to either standard. Which makes me suspicious that even have a clue what they are doing. I would opt for a different lab.

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The engine has a ton of blow-by, it has been idled to death by the previous owner[s]. But the oil consumption is low [2 gallons in a 400hr, 18,000 mile oil change cycle]. Total engine hours are 23,000 @ 700k miles. I did the rods and mains when I did the overhead to physically inspect the engine [appears fine]. No dyno has been done. The fuel % just seems to high to me. It will be oil change time in several weeks what other lab should a 2nd sample be sent to? Cat green flagged this sample!

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As a quick way, take a sample and go to a local place that has on site oil analysis. Like, if there is a Speedco near you, or any oil distributor can get you sample kits. Otherwise, there are good labs you can find online like Oil Analyzers, Inc, Stavely, Polaris, Blackstone, etc. and get a sample kit from them.

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Kenneth will be eternally grateful.
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