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How often should the crankcase filter be changed?

I was looking in the Cummins manual and it stated that the change interval was 125k or 1 year for the crankcase filter. When I changed mine at 125 it was completely black and dripping oil, which I figure was not good. So how often does everyone else change this filter out?

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I have a 2012 ISX. I change mine at 50,000 which is a lot soon than my manual says. It will be black and full of oil. There will also be water from condensation. Have a rag or papertowel under it when you loosen the bolts to catch water and oil.

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Cummins says every 90,000 miles. If you are not running heavy all the time they say you might need to change it more often?

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I have a 2009 ISX and Cummin's recommend 125,000 miles or the one I use is 3,000 Hrs or At least once a year,,,

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I have a 2010 Cummins ISX 500 and the recommended interval is 125,000 miles or 200,000 km. Don't go over! I was shutdown at 12,000KM in cold weather when the condensation froze the filter. I carry a spare now, as the $800 tow bill was a good learning experience!

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2011 Cummins ISX 485 Change at 125,000 miles. Be careful not to over tighten, as the tabs will snap. Also make sure you set the filter in place properly or it will leak oil. Hope this helps. I've already experienced the above.

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It begs the question on what the intake looks like with the crankcase stuff going back into the engine. They did this to my 2006 Jeep Liberty Diesel. When I bought the thing, I blocked off the crankcase routing back to the engine and ran a tube down to just let it out into the air like all the other diesels in the past. But you should see the intakes of those that didn't do that.... man what a mess. When that oily air contacts the soot from the EGR coming in, it creates a real mess. Not saying that this is the case with the big engines, but it sure leaves a bad mental image.

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