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Where can you find rolling resistance number?

I want to compare different tires for rolling resistance. Can't find much on manufacturer websites....help!

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michelen tire home page. go to tool box, youll see it.

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sorry thats michelen truck tires home page, then click on tool box.

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Try this web site. It should be the Michelin Fuel saving calculator.

http://www.michelintruck.com/michelintru...

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Thanks for all replies. What about other tire brands?

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Most Helpful Answer

You can check the website" America moves by truck.com". On the left side of the main page, there is a drop down menu with rolling resistance , click on there. They list most popular brands.

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Michelin has done extensive testing and has cataloged all the better known and some not as well known brands. Just try the link. If you're looking for some never heard of back woods 'Made in Indonesia' brand of tire it's probably not going to be listed anywhere and you may not want it because it's probably got a 200 rolling resistance anyway.

Just check the Michelin site.

Or you can go to letstruck.com and click on tool box. But it uses the Michelin website still.

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OK, I have found the webpage and have seen the numbers. How can the average trucker determine what fuel savings can be obtained by these numbers. For example, I have 8 Bridgestone M726EL drive tires on my truck with a rolling resistance of 141. I am looking at a rib tire with a resistance of 102. Can anyone explain to me what I would save in fuel to change tires. The bridgestones are still very new (2/32" worn from new of 32/32"). I bought the tires before I learned about the possibilities of fuel savings with a lower rolling resistance. Thanks in advance to all who reply...Geoff

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Looking at the site, if read everything and type in your information, at the bottom of the screen there is a button that will calculate everything for you. But you have to pick a tire for all axles.

Kevin keeps saying if your rolling resistance is as high as yours, you can take brand new tires and Throw them out, switch to a better rolling resistant tire and come out on top.

If you use the fuel savings calculator you will see what I'm talking about.

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To calculate the fuel savings with different tires use Michelin's "Fuel Savings Calculator"

http://www.michelintruck.com/michelintru...

Yokohama also has a "Tire Fuel Calculator"

http://www.yokohamatire.com/fuel_calcula...

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Continental also has a calculator that includes all the major brands and gives side-by-side comparison. It also includes other factors such as initial purchase price and casing acceptance rate to give total lifetime cost of the tire.

ContiCostCalculator

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None of these resources help answer the question asked.

I am importing tires that are EPA Smartway rated and my mfg plant has told me that "the rolling resistance coefficient in KG FORCE /METRIC TON is 6.48."

How do I then take that number and turn it into the 1-200 numbers you see on sites like this?

http://americamovesbytruck.com/rollingre...

Nobody has been able to answer me on it yet. Can anyone tell me how to get to that number?

Thank you,

Eric

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The Michelin website gives you a number that is "indexed"

In other words a tire rated higher than the indexed number will be less fuel efficient.

So if the Michelin is rated at 100, and a Continental is rated at 105, the Continental is 5% worse than the Michelin.

Also if the number was 95 for instance, it would be 5% better in fuel economy.

To calculate the true difference you would need the true rolling resistance coefficient.

Check with a quality tire dealer, they can help

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I've heard that as a tire wears down, it gets better MPG's. Which makes sense, especially for lug treads, because the lugs are soft and compress under load, therefore the tire gets harder as it wears down (less rolling resistance) but with less traction in bad conditions. Presuming that's true, need to take that into consideration when deciding to replace them. The rolling resistance might be less than the specs when new.

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Low rolling resistance tires have a softer tread than higher rr ones - feel the difference between xda and xdn2. They are tested for rr when brand new.

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Interesting. I'll take a guess that low RR tires need softer compound for the tread to increase traction, to compensate for a smaller patch of tread that is in contact with the ground. Which makes me wonder if low RR tires have shorter lifespans and warranties (softer compound tends to wear down faster).

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I don't know about warranties but low rr tires don't last anywhere near as long as high rr ones. In theory fuel savings shoul d make up for having to buy tires more often though.

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That's a crucial question: do fuel savings make up for the extra tire expense. Or actually, it should more than make up for it. And what happens if you get flat? Do most shops carry low RR tires? If not, can you mix and match them on the tractor, so a local shop can install a regular one? Or does this force carrying a spare or two at all times?

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gjd will be eternally grateful.
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