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Retread trailer tires in drive position

I am curious if anyone has used trailer tread recaps in the drive position. if so what kind of results did you have. I know caps have a higher rolling resistance but is it much lower with trailer tread. how long will they last. Mabey something worth thinking about.

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I would really like to get Kevins input on this topic.

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As would I, I think I may stay up tonight and call him and find out. I'm about three months out and unfortunately in a spot where recaps may be my only option. I've looked at the different Bandag Ecopia tires and the B197 Ecopia has a pretty decent rolling resistance for a recap tire. I'm just not sure how a recap trailer tire would do in a drive position. Id be afraid I'd rip the cap off since its a tire designed to be in a non-torqued position.

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I emailed the question along with my more specific question since the show is not live tonight. I'll let ya guys know what he says if someone doesn't call before he gets back to me.

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It's the casing, not tread that mostly accounts for low rolling resistance. I ran 2 XOne XTE and 2 XOne XTA casings retreaded with XDA cap. It worked but I won't be using caps again.

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Jerry that's what I though that it was the casing but I called Michelins Tech Dept. and talked to them about this very thing and they told me its the tread that dictates the Rolling Resistance not the casing and I also asked them about 24.5 versus 22.5 for rolling resistance and Michelin told me as long as the tread is the same and what I mean by that is say XZA 3 in a 22.5 and 24.5 has the same rolling resistance cause of the tread they use on that model tire.

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The flex in the sidewall is more important than what the tread looks like. I'm going by what KR says on this because it makes sense. I don't know...one thing I know is I run 62mph at 1500rpms all day and heavy get close to 7mph. Before I pulled off 2 XOne XDN2s i had to run easier- still at 62mph but easier throttle on hills etc. I figure I picked up roughly .3-.4 mpg by going all trailer tires. Tread pattern makes a difference because of how it comes into contact with the ground I would think. Also the flatter the better?

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I'm thinking I'd go with the Tire Engineers on this one. I do know the side wall flex has impact on Rolling Resistance though. I'm thinking the tread has a lot more to do with it than the sidewall though.

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I think Mel is correct if you take a trailer tire with a rolling resistants of 90 and cap it with a 726 tread it will go up a lot. I'm just wondering with a trailer tread cap what is the rolling resistance and how long would it last in the drive position.

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It has been my experience that retread rubber is a harder compound than new tire rubber. I run the Marangoli Ringtread RTA on my spread axle flat bed and I think they would work great on the drive axle.

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Jerry let me ask you this you have X One XDA Energy with RR 86 and dual with RR 86 do believe X One is still going to being a lower RR tire and do better on fuel just because single tire with less sidewall flex according Michelin the one that makes these tire say no. My information came right from the Michelin Tech Department I would think they would know more about their tires than KR.

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The dual XDA Energy is 100 RR and the single is 86. So i don't think that tech knows what he's talking about. Maybe he was confused...

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There'd be no point in getting the XOne if the XDA Dual had the same RR.

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I have been going through this myself. I worked w/Southern Tire. They use Bandag retreads. Not knowing much about retreads I had them retread my SS that came on my spread axle when I bought it. They pulled them off my trailer, and installed the only retreads that are used in their area, the BTR-UWB according to the tire sales rep. They gave me no other recommendations.

Bandag has only one Trailer SS retread, the BTR-UWB/ WIDE BODY, known as super singles. They have a good RR of 92 according to the chart on retreads, see (americamovesbytruck.com/rollingresistance.php). Cost about $250 each.

I believe the Bandag corp. rep said the trailer UBW treads were made for standard trailers. He also said that the drive axles have more torque put on them, and this has to be considered. Suggesting it would be better to have "all arounds" BRR-UWB, w/RR-120, than to have trailer tires on drives. They have a higher RR-120.

The Bandag rep said the BDR-UWB/RR-192, 24/32, drive tire recaps, high scrub, would be the better solution for drives and if they were to be used on trailer spread axles.

Glean what you can from the above. Or call Bandag corp. # 800 847 3272. I spoke to John Corona.

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Jearzy that's not what the Tech meant. What he said is if you have a dual and super single with the very same RR the fuel mileage gain would same for either tire.

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OK, I was confused then :)

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Confusion all around *in flo's voice* lol

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The rolling resistance on the Bandag B197 FuelTech 230 11 (which I'm guessing is the recap for the R197 Ecopia) is 87.

If this tire will hold up for it's tire life and not shred the cap from the torque it's not intended to get, I could see this being a feasible option. At least for me. I'm going to be coming from M726 EL tires. So even going to the B710 FuelTech 230 25 I'd see an improvement.

While it's not my ideal situation to put caps on, I've made some bad decisions and had some unplanned downtime that's got me stuck. I could either put the B197 FuelTech on (if it'll hold up) or the B710 FuelTech and charge it to my maintenance account with the leasing company and see no out of pocket costs outside my weekly contributions or get the Michelin XDA Energy through my carrier's national account and have them most likely charge the full amount back to my settlement, leaving me without a paycheck for the next several weeks.

According to Michelin's Fuel Savings Calculator the savings with the XDA Energy over the B710 is 1200 a year, I would actually save money getting the B197 by about the same amount and if I were to get the M710 I'd still be better off. However if i got the XZA (shows lower rr than the XZA3+) I'd save 1300 a year over the M710 and only 276 a year over the B197. I'd save almost 2500 a year over the B710 with the XZA. (That I think would be worth the no paycheck for a couple weeks even though I'm not really in a position to afford that)

I think if the B197 is a viable option in the drive position, it would actually work out better. It really would come down to the cost of the tires, since all of those savings listed don't include the price of the tire (unless Michelin calculates that in their savings calculator?)

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how much are the caps/tire?

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I have been quoted a price of appx $200 for the B710 I haven't asked about the B197 or if they'll even approve an all-position in the drive spot (since I've got a negative maintenance reserve with them they kind of have a bit of a say cause I'm technically spending their money). Between the two caps I'd be better off with the B197, I'm just not sure if a capped all-position would stand up to the torque on the drive position. Between the two caps its nearly a $2500 a year savings in fuel going with the B197

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so the b710 is a trailer and b197 all position? all position will hold up as long as the casing was of good quality and the cap was glued well. i guess the same might go for the trailer tire. 2 things about trailer tires: (i ran 2 xone xta and 2 xte that i picked up dirt cheap used) the cords damage easily will low tread and the traction was poor on wet roads. i think the cost vs fuel savings between virgins and caps is a wash but the biggest thing might be the longevity.

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the B710 is a drive tire, its the recap version of the M710 and the B197 is the recap of the all-position R197. I guess the point about it being glued well could apply to even the B710, my concern would be whether or not Bandag would warranty the B197 in a drive position. They may claim the increased torque caused the problem. I suppose I could call them and ask but you know how engineers are, they're going to give me the safe answer and say the B710 is the drive tire not the B197 even though the B197 is an all-position. As far as cost goes, the B710 vs the M710 it'd take almost two years to see the fuel savings so I'd say it's a wash, I'd get an extra 1/32 of tread life out of the M710 though.

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BAD idea... trailer-tire sidewalls are not built for the torque of the drive position.

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yet there are plenty of people who do so with no problem and have seen tremendous fuel savings due to the drastically lower rolling resistance. I spoke to an owner who owned the rig and trailer, had all-position straight tread tires in all 18 positions and has been doing so for nearly 20 years. I asked him about tire failures and he said he didn't have any abnormal amount versus what he did before he switched to all-positions. It's also allowed him to move tires from any position to another to try and save the tire due to irregular wear instead of having to replace it.

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seems to be a mix up here. trailer tires are just that,trailer tires. they can be used as drive tires, just won't last as long, and if the mpg gain saves more money with putting a new set on more often then why not? all position tires (often called steer tires) can be used in every position and are meant for that whether steer, drive or trailer.

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took the words right outta my mouth, Jerzy. My new Pete has 10 All-Position tires...

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I believe you are right about the mix up, my apologies for bein a bit sarcastic with my response. When I read the OP's topic I just translated the trailer tire into all-position in my head.

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Well, I called into the bonus hour last night and Kevin said the B197 FuelTech would be a great option in my particular case. He said the recap isn't an issue to worry about it has always been the rolling resistance on the recaps that has been his issue.

The B197 FuelTech 230 11 has a rolling resistance of 87, which is actually better than that of the XOne XDA Energy.

So if the OP meant all-position trailer when saying trailer tire, Kevin thinks it's a good option in my situation. Considering recaps are cheaper than new tires, if they survive I don't see why this wouldn't be the option for anyone who's considering the idea.

I'll be putting the B197s on the truck within the next three months. I'm going to get at least another 10,000 miles out of the tires I have now unless I can get up to Green Bay where I get discounted install at Pomps. If OP has some time to wait before making the decision, I'll be able to give you my personal experience of it by mid-summer.

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that is really good rr. did you get a quote for the 197s yet?

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No I need to make a call tomorrow and get them.

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Neil Wolbeck will be eternally grateful.
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