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Heavy duty coolant engineered to maximize diesel efficiency and engine life. Technologically superior to all water-based coolants.

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Life span and testing for evans coolant?

I was reading on the forum some complaints about Evans thicking up with age and possibly pitting liners.

I was going to Switch to Evans and run my engine at 215 degrees, Is there a testing procedure other than the water percentage that a person can do? Maybe once a year or so sample the coolant and have the viscosity checked?

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Viscosity is relevant cause the water pump can only circulate what it was designed for. I ran the Evans Coolant for about a year worked great for about the first 3 months then as it started getting thicker and the thicker it got the hotter the engine was running. When I pulled the Evans out the Coolant was running 245 degrees and that was with OEM thermostats in it.

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Did you get any compensation from Evans for the coolant, since it got "thicker" as you said. What caused thickening?

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Milica when I called Evans and told them what had happen I found out then it was never tested on EGR engine at that time I had explain to them what a EGR was they had never heard of a EGR but to answer your question NO

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So Mel, did you keep Evans or did you replace it with regular coolant? What do you run in now?

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Milica I have replaced the Evans with Extended Life Coolant (RED) and I will never run the Evans again had to much trouble with it and it cost me fortune to fix the engine when I was running the Evans.

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Rick I had a filter on on mine changed it every 2 weeks but it didn't stop the Evans from getting thicker on mine engine myself I don't think the Evans can handle the heat exchange of EGR cooler which is a temp of around 700 to 800 degrees. It got to the point that the engine was running 235 degrees on a hard pull which in turn was causing the oil temp to reach 245 degrees and according to oil mfg you'll start to shorten the life of the oil additive package at 247 degrees so between that and all the cracked heads, cracked egr coolers and 1 scored piston and liner I chose to go back to coolant that's proven itself.

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Mel, I'm not sure. You may very well be right. We had a pre EGR engine. I know we went through quite a few filters in the beginning until the system was cleaned out. So far no troubles and thanks for the heads up on the water testing. Evans big pitch is that their coolant will handle higher temperatures than traditional glycol based coolants. They say that the traditional coolants start to break down at temperatures over 220 degrees F. Also another good point you make is the raise in oil temperature. I've often wondered what the long terms affects of this might be.

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I don't think viscosity is relevant to coolant. And with eliminating the water from the system pitting or cavitation shouldn't be an issue but it would probably be a good idea to send a sample to a lab like Polaris once or twice a year.

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When you switch to Evans coolant you need to change your coolant filter about every week to start with. The coolant will totally clean your entire coolant system and the filter is constantly filtering debris. I would recommend running one week, change your coolant filter. Cut the old filter so you can actually see and inspect the filter element. You will see the gunk and grime on it. Repeat this process every week until you see that your filters are coming off absolutely spotless. After that your good to go. I would expect that the older the engine, the more gunk, grime, and debris that will be in it. If you don't do it this way your filter will clog and your coolant becomes contaminated, which is why you hear people saying it worked great for a while then thickened up and ran hot. Once the entire cooling system is cleaned, pitting and cavitation shouldn't ever be a problem, and it should be a life time coolant that can withstand the higher temperatures.

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Colin Allan will be eternally grateful.
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