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Current version by: Cliff ,

Text:

All engines, rebuilds and new, the initial wear numbers could be all over the map. It usually takes a while for things to settle down. I never really start establishing trend lines on wear numbers and oil holding up till I pass 40,000 miles. I would just go as you are and take another sample at the next oil change. Magnesium, I wouldn't worry too much about. Many oils are starting to use higher levels of Magnesium as part of the add pack. Mine uses about 950 ppm of magnesium fresh out of the jug! Potassium combined with zinc in the additive package is the extreme pressure modifier that helps cams & rockers among other things. Some oils will use higher levels of potassium and even sodium in their additive packages.
 
Aluminum and tin are indeed wear metals, but because they are elevated in a newly rebuilt engine really doesn't mean much. Tin is used in bearings, but there is no real need for concern unless also getting elevated levels of lead and copper, which also make up rod and cam bearings.
 
The way to know what comes with the oil and what is coming from the engine is to have a new, virgin sample of the oil you are using tested so you can establish a base line and actually know if things are elevated when you send in a used oil sample. many folks fail to find out what their oil actually is made of. Otherwise, one is just guessing.
 
It is pretty early in the game on that rebuilt motor to start concerning yourself over excessive blowby. Let the motor settle in.
 
The Petroleum Quality Institute of America has done a lot of the leg work for us. They have tested a lot of name brand diesel oils and post the results of what they are made of on their site. www.pqiamerica.com
 
Here is a side by side comparison of several diesel oils done by PQIA: http://www.pqiamerica.com/June%202014/consolidated%20HDEO%202015.html

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Edit by: Cliff ,

Text:

All engines, rebuilds and new, the initial wear numbers could be all over the map. It usually takes a while for things to settle down. I never really start establishing trend lines on wear numbers and oil holding up till I pass 40,000 miles. I would just go as you are and take another sample at the next oil change. Magnesium, I wouldn't worry too much about. Many oils are starting to use higher levels of Magnesium as part of the add pack. Mine uses about 950 ppm of magnesium fresh out of the jug! Potassium combined with zinc in the additive package is the extreme pressure modifier that helps cams & rockers among other things. Some oils will use higher levels of potassium and even sodium in their additive packages.
 
Aluminum and tin are indeed wear metals, but because they are elevated in a newly rebuilt engine really doesn't mean much. Tin is used in bearings, but there is no real need for concern unless also getting elevated levels of lead and copper, which also make up rod and cam bearings.
 
The way to know what comes with the oil and what is coming from the engine is to have a new, virgin sample of the oil you are using tested so you can establish a base line and actually know if things are elevated when you send in a used oil sample. many folks fail to find out what their oil actually is made of. Otherwise, one is just guessing.
 
It is pretty early in the game on that rebuilt motor to start concerning yourself over excessive blowby. Let the motor settle in.
 
The Petroleum Quality Institute of America has done a lot of the leg work for us. They have tested a lot of name brand diesel oils and post the results of what they are made of on their site. www.pqiamerica.com

Status:

open

Edit by: Cliff ,

Text:

All engines, rebuilds and new, the initial wear numbers could be all over the map. It usually takes a while for things to settle down. I never really start establishing trend lines on wear numbers and oil holding up till I pass 40,000 miles. I would just go as you are and take another sample at the next oil change. Magnesium, I wouldn't worry too much about. Many oils are starting to use higher levels of Magnesium as part of the add pack. Mine uses about 950 ppm of magnesium fresh out of the jug! Potassium combined with zinc in the additive package is the extreme pressure modifier that helps cams & rockers among other things. Some oils will use higher levels of potassium and even sodium in their additive packages.
 
Aluminum and tin are indeed wear metals, but because they are elevated in a newly rebuilt engine really doesn't mean much. Tin is used in bearings, but there is no real need for concern unless also getting elevated levels of lead and copper, which also make up rod and cam bearings.
Aluminum and tin are indeed wear metals, but because they are elevated in a newly rebuilt engine really doesn't mean much. Tin is used in bearings, but there is no real need for concern unless also getting elevated levels of lead and copper, which also make up rod and cam bearings.
 
The way to know what comes with the oil and what is coming from the engine is to have a new, virgin sample of the oil you are using tested so you can establish a base line and actually know if things are elevated when you send in a used oil sample. many folks fail to find out what their oil actually is made of. Otherwise, one is just guessing.
 
It is pretty early in the game on that rebuilt motor to start concerning yourself over excessive blowby. Let the motor settle in.

Status:

open

Edit by: Cliff ,

Text:

All engines, rebuilds and new, the initial wear numbers could be all over the map. It usually takes a while for things to settle down. I never really start establishing trend lines on wear numbers and oil holding up till I pass 40,000 miles. I would just go as you are and take another sample at the next oil change. Magnesium, I wouldn't worry too much about. Many oils are starting to use higher levels of Magnesium as part of the add pack. Mine uses about 950 ppm of magnesium fresh out of the jug! Potassium combined with zinc in the additive package is the extreme pressure modifier that helps cams & rockers among other things. Some oils will use higher levels of potassium and even sodium in their additive packages.
All engines, rebuilds and new, the initial wear numbers could be all over the map. It usually takes a while for things to settle down. I never really start establishing trend lines on wear numbers and oil holding up till I pass 40,000 miles. I would just go as you are and take another sample at the next oil change. Magnesium, I wouldn't worry too much about. Many oils are starting to use higher levels of Magnesium as part of the add pack. Mine uses about 950 ppm of magnesium fresh out of the jug! Potassium combined with zinc in the additive package is the extreme pressure modifier that helps cams & rockers among other things. Some oils will use higher levels of potassium and even sodium in their additive packages.
 
Aluminum and tin are indeed wear metals, but because they are elevated in a newly rebuilt engine really doesn't mean much. Tin is used in bearings, but there is no real need for concern unless also getting elevated levels of lead and copper, which also make up rod bearings.
 
The way to know what comes with the oil and what is coming from the engine is to have a new, virgin sample of the oil you are using tested so you can establish a base line and actually know if things are elevated when you send in a used oil sample. many folks fail to find out what their oil actually is made of. Otherwise, one is just guessing.
 
It is pretty early in the game on that rebuilt motor to start concerning yourself over excessive blowby. Let the motor settle in.

Status:

open

Edit by: Cliff ,

Text:

All engines, rebuilds and new, the initial wear numbers could be all over the map. It usually takes a while for things to settle down. I never really start establishing trend lines on wear numbers and oil holding up till I pass 40,000 miles. I would just go as you are and take another sample at the next oil change. Magnesium, I wouldn't worry too much about. Many oils are starting to use higher levels of Magnesium as part of the add pack. Mine uses about 950 ppm of magnesium fresh out of the jug! Potassium combined with zinc in the additive package is the extreme pressure modifier that helps cams rockers among other things. Some oils will use higher levels of potassium and even sodium in their additive packages.
 
Aluminum and tin are indeed wear metals, but because they are elevated in a newly rebuilt engine really doesn't mean much. Tin is used in bearings, but there is no real need for concern unless also getting elevated levels of lead and copper, which also make up rod bearings.
 
The way to know what comes with the oil and what is coming from the engine is to have a new, virgin sample of the oil you are using tested so you can establish a base line and actually know if things are elevated when you send in a used oil sample. many folks fail to find out what their oil actually is made of. Otherwise, one is just guessing.
 
It is pretty early in the game on that rebuilt motor to start concerning yourself over excessive blowby. Let the motor settle in.

Status:

open

Original post by: Cliff ,

Text:

All engines, rebuilds and new, the initial wear numbers could be all over the map.  It usually takes a while for things to settle down.  I never really start establishing trend lines on wear numbers and oil holding up till I pass 40,000 miles.  I would just go as you are and take another sample at the next oil change.  Magnesium, I wouldn't worry too much about.  Many oils are starting to use higher levels of Magnesium as part of the add pack.  Mine uses about 950 ppm of magnesium fresh out of the jug!    Potassium combined with zinc in the additive package is the extreme pressure modifier that helps cams rockers among other things.  Some oils will use higher levels of potassium and even sodium in their additive packages.

Aluminum and tin are indeed wear metals, but because they are elevated in a newly rebuilt engine really doesn't mean much.  Tin is used in bearings, but there is no real need for concern unless also getting elevated levels of lead and copper, which also make up rod bearings.

The way to know what comes with the oil and what is coming from the engine is to have a new, virgin sample of the oil you are using tested so you can establish a base line and actually know if things are elevated when you send in a used oil sample.  many folks fail to find out what their oil actually is made of.  Otherwise, one is just guessing.

Status:

open